Events Needed In The Guidelines:

 

 

 

Ghortahnti events:

 

  • Arrival on Mi’Zhika:
  • Exploring:
  • Entering the lower lake:
  • Creating and installing turbines:
  • Painting the lower caverns:
  • Painting and settling in the first caves above:
  • Opening the mine:
  • Exploring the other side again? ā†’ Why/why not and when?
  • Changes to the chapel:
  • Constructing a bigger shipyard:
  • Decorating other tunnels:
  • Carving their own man-made tunnels and caves:
  • Adding the final machinery up in the living caves’ tunnel:
  • Final touches in the tombs:
  • Different funerals:
  • Deciding to leave:
  • Destroying the shipyard:
  • Departure:

 

 

Kanlezhoyti history:

 

  • First signs of Kahlezhitee expansion: several sub-tribes are united (sometimes by force) under a single tribe’s banner. Mahdheykhab, the last descendant of the most powerful tribe who started this unification, is known as the creator of Ashkim and the first Kahlezhitee king.
  • The Kahlezhitee system, also known as Ashkim on Kanlezhoy, is born. A representative from each clan is chosen as the base of a future feudal-like tribal system and nobility. These “elected few” are given the opportunity to act as ministers for the king. If the king was ever to die without having any direct male descendant, it would be up to these chiefs to present themselves as potential candidates for the throne and to vote for the one they preferred. If the votes were tied, a priest would roll dices. The new king would then marry the previous king’s widow, sister or daughter according to his age and the circumstances. If the elected king was already married, then he would have two wives. This was the only exception in early Kahlezhiti law that allowed polygamy. But then again, the king did have other, far more notable privileges and was indeed above laws…
  • Cheofehsh II and his cousins incite the other tribes to follow them and expand their kingdom “until they reached the sea, mountains or some other natural boundaries that would be a sign from the Creator to stop”. Their strategies involve raiding little villages first to test their opponents and see just how numerous they are. Once they have gathered a big army in one spot, the Kahlezhitee would send just the right amount of troops to fight them while all of the other tribes would go plunder helpless regions.
    They move north-eastwards.
  • Their biggest task is to take over Rihnkahlezhtee territories. These people live in volcanoes and though they lacked a firm social organization, their troglodytic villages held on for nearly two centuries.
  • First peace treaty signed between the Rihnkahlezhtee and the Kahlezhitee. Kheapah, Cheofehsh’s grandson, marries a notable resistant chief’s daughter. To “seal the treaty with blood ties”, Kheapah orders that five hundred of his men marry five hundred Rihnkahlezhtee women, while two hundred Rihnkahlezhtee soldiers would have to marry two hundred girls from his soldiers’ families. He thought that it was a way to ensure that their new allies and vassals wouldn’t betray them. It was also said that he wanted to decrease potential genetic weaknesses that came from both peoples since they came from isolated, mountainous regions had not mixed much. He hoped to install some sort of new “tradition” that would give him more land and make his subjects a powerful, homogenous people when it came to culture, knowledge, technology, tactics, and health.
  • Kheapah makes more laws concerning tolerance and calls his new kingdom Shkehlkarro (Brilliant Plains). His second son decides to finish what his great-grandfather started and gathers a powerful, multi-tribal army with which he invades other regions further East. His men easily conquer the Steenoytee and imitate Kheapah when he first conquered the Rihnkehlezhtee. He is forced to stop since the vast, uninhabited moors of the East, beyond Steenoyti territories, are too barren and cold in the winter to be crossed. He gives up all hopes of ever seeing what lays beyond after the frozen lands of the East. Instead, he creates his own capital on Steenoyti territories just like Kheapah had done earlier and declares himself king of Steenkarro in [insert date here].
  • Kheapah and Hadhuraii get into terrible arguments. In the end, Kheapah abdicates in favour of his eldest son Cheofehsh III but allows Hadhuraii to keep Steenkarro. However, Cheofehsh III dies without a son and his nephew is proclaimed king of both kingdoms, which are united under the name Kheapah had first chosen. Zjarret 1st, who doesn’t want to have to vex his late father or uncle’s relatives, decides that the new capital will be in the new land closest to his ancestors’ home. His counsellors advise him to change course and see what is South. But legend has it that as he fell asleep, troubled about having to make a choice, he saw his father, uncle and grandfather in a dream. His grandfather told him to go south and look for a great green serpent of ice; his capital would have to be where the serpent drank from the sea. The serpent turns out to be the ___ river.
  • Zjarret invades the Peshinooti’s territories and repeats his ancestors’ tradition, being as much of an idealist as his grandfather. He founds his capital where the river flows into the sea and calls it Bi’Kalezhoan (“city of the little mountains”) and calls his kingdom Kanlezhoy (“land of the green river [of ice]”). From then on, he divides the kingdom into provinces, regions and chiefdoms. Then, he creates his own flags for the kingdom, each province, region, city, tribe, army and clan. He reforms several laws and, contrary to his ancestors, forces a certain uniformity of language, culture, religion, and lifestyle on his people.
  • Being too old to go to war, it is Zjarret’s sons that gather yet another army and continue their raids up north, following the western shoreline this time.
  • The northern territories are conquered after a hundred-year-long resistance and help from neighbouring islands. The Bi’Minoytee flee for their islands once Zjarret’s great-grandsons finally get hold of their country’s continental regions.
  • Twenty-five years later, Terrpah II Ztoshehm (“Terrpah the harsh”) and his men manage to beat the Bi’Minoytee’s army and, instead of signing a peace treaty, plunder, burn and destroy all that they can. The population eventually manages to force them out.
  • The Seventh War (between the Kanlezhoyti and the Bi’Minoytee).
  • Cheofehsh VI eventually manages to reconquer the islands. However, there is not so much as a peace treaty. In fact, most Bi’Minoytees saw his laws as even more humiliating that those of his predecessors.
  • Kheaphoan massacres: the Bi’Minoyti population literally slaughters all insular Kanlezhoyti. It got its name from the Kanlezhoyti province’s capital of Kheaphoan, where it started.
  • Mahdheykhab II strikes back and wipes out all resistance. He forces the same unions as his ancestors once suggested and is strict about laws concerning the Bi’Minoytee. They are given the choice between being deported and having Peshinooti pioneers sent on their islands. The Bi’Minoytee chose the later and actually end up bounding strong ties with this people. For several centuries, the Peshinooti saw the Bi’Minoytee as direct “friends” and ended up adopting parts of their culture and lifestyle.
  • During this era, the Bi’Minoyti culture is finally recognized as more developed than the Kahlezhitee thought and becomes “in”. Artists and great thinkers are brought to the king’s court to share their knowledge with the rest of the kingdom.
  • Thurehssa XIII considers the past Kahlezhitee system as far too ancient for Kanlezhoy’s current society and reforms it according to his own beliefs and Bi’Minoytee requests. The Onimu system is born. This divides each province into caste-like categories; instead of being considered as normal, equal citizens of Kanlezhoy, each “people” (though all of them had mixed and spoke thousands of dialects before his laws) is given “a task to accomplish for the whole of society to function properly”. The Peshinooti are thus supposed to remain fishermen, sailors or such all their lives and from generation to generation. The Rihnkahlezhtee became synonymous to miners, engineers and architects, while the Steenoytee had to specialize in farming. The Bi’Minoytee became known as merchants, artists and archivists. The Kahlezhitee, of course, were the ruling people, being warriors and “protecting” Kanlehzhoy.
    This system was not forced on the population: the king just based it on common stereotypes and thought it would help uniformize the kingdom.

 

Various events occurred, including crises from within and without and different types of innovations in several areas. Over the centuries, the Kanlezhoyti population evolved, mixed, and changed systems. It lost nearly all of its past languages and different aspects of its cultures (religion, popular beliefs, etc) to the Kahlezhitee’s profit. The only two provinces that made it a point to maintain their cultural differences and which were sometimes supported by other Kanlezhoyti were the Rihnkahlezhtee and Bi’Minoytee.

Each culture was assimilated and then standardized in such a way that Kanlehzhoy was known as a single country with a single people and culture.

Here are just a few other events that were memorable enough for the current Peshinooti population to mention from time to time.

 

 

  • Snuur becomes the most powerful Bi’Minoytee at the royal court. In ___, his daughter marries king Jyelahn’s adoptive son. In ___, their third son, Roymuur, is crowned king at thirty-five years old and changes his name to Haonahp XV. He is the very first Kanlezhoyti king not to have direct Kahlezhiti ancestors on his father’s side.
  • Third Bi’Minoyti rebellion after Haonahp’s great-grandson’s death in ____. The province manages to separate along with western Kahlezhiti and Peshinooti territories, creating the “maritime kingdom of Perahdet”. However, it turns into a tyranny 200 years later and the population begs for Kanlezhoy to free them.
  • The Kanlehzhoyti Renaissance:
  • The “Troubled Times”:
  • King Toonahk II, (from the old Rihnkahlezhtee nobility) whose grandfather restored peace in Kanlezhoy, reforms the economic and educational systems before abdicating in favour of a more democratic system. He remains one of Kanlezhoy’s most loved rulers.
  • The Pi’ Njerazh system is born. Zjarret’s palace is renovated and turned renamed “People’s Palace”. It is where all counsellors and provincial representatives meet to make plans for Kanlezhoy’s future. The kingdom and provinces’ flags and mottos are replaced by new ones.
  • From __ (three hundred years later) to ___, several laws are created in order to ensure equality amongst “castes”. In ___, a set of laws are voted in an attempt to get rid of the former “castes”. However, nobody really respects them since most “castes” don’t exist anyway and refer to provinces where people live.
    These laws forbid discrimination and incite different dialects to develop. However, most people have forgotten all about their ancestors’ ways or languages. Each dialect is identified and listed nonetheless.
  • Trade develops more and more. A lot of immigrants from neighbouring lands establish in Kanlezhoy now that it is calm again, though they mostly gather in “flat” provinces like Pesh’nah, Steenoy and Bi’Minoy.
  • (Six hundred years later) A different people whom the Kanlezhoyti refer to as the “Noorehni” begins to invade its neighbours in a similar manner as that of the Kahlezhitee in the ___’s. This leads to massive immigration from the East, which is pretty well accepted as Kanlezhoy still needs to reconstruct itself from its previous crises. The Provincial Council sees it as a way to start something new though its members don’t understand it is a sign that danger is right at Kanlehzhoy’s borders.
  • First Noorehni invasions. The Kanlehzhoyti and their allies throw them out after a twenty-five-year-long struggle.
  • Second Noorehni invasions. This time, chaos breaks lose and the Provincial Council has trouble organizing Kanlehzhoy’s defence. Careless moves and inconsiderate tactics give the Noorehni opportunities to slaughter entire villages and enter the eastern provinces.
  • Kanlehzhoy’s allies are either defeated or forced to surrender. Kanlehzhoy fights the Noorehni alone.
  • The Kanlehzhoyti demand that their Provincial Council be replaced.
  • The new Provincial Council is chosen too quickly and eventually hints they will surrender in order to spare bloodshed. The people manifest its anger while extremists try to seize power or organize futile military movements.
  • An extremist group known as the “Pure Ones” (“Stsahperi” in Kanlehzhoyti) makes a coup d’Etat and proclaims its leader king of Kanlehzhoy. He is thus renamed “Shkehlkhab XVII Stsahperpah” of Kanlehzhoy, 1st ruler of the fourth dynasty” although there should have never been such a dynasty, considering monarchy had died ___ years earlier and that Shkehlkhab wasn’t even of noble descent to begin with (though he claimed to be a direct descendant of Zjarret’s sixth grandson).
    Unbeknownst to the rest of the population, all members of both former Provincial Councils are arrested and decapitated in the People’s Palace.
    Shkehlkhab XVII claims the palace as his own and tries to recreate Mahdheykhab’s outdated Ashkim system, using his followers as new clan representatives.
  • Seeing the current system’s failures, a lot of the most rural regions go back to their ancient (but not entirely forgotten) tribal system. Meanwhile, the Noorehni go on raiding the eastern regions and even try to attack the northern shores thanks to ships they got from their new colonies.
  • During the summer of ____, the Noorehni break into Kanlezhoy and completely slaughter the Steenoyti population. There are no Steenoyti survivors. This impressively rapid genocide frightens the rest of Kanlehzhoy so much that even the new king is left powerless. The new tribal councils meet in Bi’Minoy’s former capital and decide it is time to deport all citizens since there is nothing else to be done. However, the Rihnkahlezhtee and Peshinootee decide to remain faithful to Kanlehzhoy, even if its current government is flawed.
  • The Bi’Minoytee all leave, even under the king’s curses and threats. Meanwhile, the Noorehni have began to march westward again. The Rihnkahlezhtee decide to definitively separate from the rest of Kanlehzhoy and try to recreate their former kingdom. Its nationalist movements disgust the Peshinooti who decide to leave like the Bi’Minoyti, before it is too late. The Kahlezhiti try to force them to stay behind but eventually give up and claim that victory against the Noorehni is still possible if everyone remains united. However, it is already too late.
  • The Peshinooti leave Kanlehzhoy once and for all. Some Kahlezhiti imitate them during the following weeks though they cannot catch up with them and are thus lost in different directions.
  • The Rihnkalezhtee, who are comfortably hidden in their volcanoes, fight the Noorehni until the later are tired and just continue their march westwards.
  • The Kahlezhitee, who expect the Noorehni to give up in Rihnkalezhoy or to have been stopped by the southern mountain’s harsh climate and dangerous trails, are taken by surprise. The entire population is wiped out.
    Contrarily to the Kahlezhiti who thought that mixing cultures in order to obtain what was best from each one of them to make that the “national culture”, the Noorehni preferred to get rid of native populations and their past when they could so that their increasing population had enough space and could keep its own culture. It did not occur to them that their predecessors might have done things that were worth keeping or modifying.

 

Nothing else is known of Kanlehzhoy’s fate after the Noorehni invasions.

 

 

Peshinooti events:

 

  • The Peshinooti roam all over the southern and western oceans, looking for a new home in vain.
  • Melusidh falls ill.
  • Arrival on Mi’Zhika and death of Melusidh.
  • First settlement
  • The Peshinooti explore the surrounding islands and name them.
  • Birth of the first Peshinooti child born on Mi’Zhika
  • Death of the last Peshinooti pioneer
  • Creation of the bigger city
  • First explorations in the marshes
  • Beginning of the marshes’ exploitation
  • First big shipyard
  • First explorations in the mountains
  • Discovery of the lake
  • Second type of exploration up the mountains
  • The vayrholith’s location is chosen
  • Construction of the very first vayrholith under chief Toonahk’s orders (not to be mistaken with tha Kahlezhiti ruler bearing the same name).
  • Experiments concerning the island’s rock
  • First expedition around the island
  • First expedition across the desert and first accidents.
  • Second expedition to explore the desert. Discovery of the Ghortahnti’s shipyard and mine.
  • Third expedition to explore the desert. The mine is reopened.
  • Fourth expedition to explore the desert. Some caves are found.
  • Fifth expedition in order to try and locate more caves. First accident in the mine on that same year. The mine is temporarily closed.
  • Chief Zjenah II decides to build a tunnel.
  • First attempts at carving the tunnel. The rock is so hard workers need to find a way to explode huge chunks of rock at a time.
  • The mine is reopened. Engineers adapt fix broken beams and open a second chamber.
  • Major accident in the tunnel; the ceiling collapses on several workers. Most of them are killed but others are walled alive. Only one of them survives.
  • The tunnel’s construction is stopped.
  • The tunnel’s construction starts again. Eshfahawn, the new chief, changes its course and asks for a second team of workers to work on the other side. Some of the dead workers’ bodies are found and ritually thrown in the sea according to the Peshinooti faith.
  • The tunnel is finally built, but both ends do not meet at the right spot. Eshfahawn asks his workers to polish the walls in order to broaden it and make it look decent.
  • Eshfahawn studies the Ghortahnti’s frescoes and tries to explain his interpretations to the others. They refuse to believe him and claim the caves are cursed.
  • A rumour concerning a ghost in one of the caves’ tunnels is proven right. The caves are shut and considered “a hiding place for evil spirits”.
  • The tunnel is finally finished.
  • The mine gets bigger and bigger.
  • Mihro is born.
  • Mihro begins to work on Mi’Zhika’s descriptive book.
  • Mihro begins to write Mi’Zhika’s descriptive book.
  • Mihro finishes Mi’Zhika’s descriptive book.
  • Mihro’s Korfahv’jah. He is 25 years old and presents Mi’Zhika’s descriptive book as the very first and only Age he ever wrote.
  • Mihro visits Mi’Zhika for the very first time and explains who he is. He takes a few “sabbatical years” to study his Age’s people and their culture. Karripah, the chief of the time, hosts him in his own house.
  • Mihro remains in Mi’Zhika for fifteen years. He writes all about the Peshinooti and accepts to bring a few Peshinooti to D’ni with him.
  • Karripah officially makes D’ni a compulsory second language for all things related to science, literature and mathematics. He also declares that all chiefs that are to follow him must learn this language in order to be able to interact with possible visitors. The D’ni alphabet is also officially accepted as a means to write in Peshinooti. Mihro and Seeyahnzhi alter a few letters so they may work with Peshinooti phonetics.
  • Mihro returns to Mi’Zhika with Seeyahnzhi, who agrees with Mihro on the fact the Peshinooti must not be in contact with D’ni in order not to lose their traditions and become dependent of D’ni and its products.
  • Mihro decides to build his own home on Mi’Zhika. He and Seeyahnzhi discuss possible constructions and locations.
  • Mihro asks chief Karripah for the permission to build his lighthouse on the island in the middle of the lake. Karripah agrees and gathers workers while Mihro explains what resources they must use from the island and what he will provide them.
  • Mihro and Seeyahnzhi bring the workers and artists to D’ni so they may get a better idea of what Mihro expects for his home.
  • Beginning of the lighthouse’s construction.
  • Seeyahnzhi paints his house’s cellar and carves the stand on which Mihro will put his linking book.
  • End of the lighthouse’s construction.
  • Mihro writes a linking book for his lighthouse and gives it to __ for safekeeping.
  • Mihro returns to D’ni where he works as a linguist.
  • Mihro marries ___ and returns to Mi’Zhika with her.
  • The Guild of Maintainers decide to send a few of their guildsmen to check that the Age is still stable.
  • Mayahr dies after giving birth to a dead child. Mihro does not return to Mi’Zhika for thirty years.
  • Karripah dies. His son Seeyahnzhi III becomes the new chief.
  • Mihro returns to Mi’Zhika. He begins to study the Ghortahnti more and more.
  • Mihro must leave again for his work.
  • Mihro returns to Mi’Zhika and spends his days and nights in the caves. He does not understand what the “ghost” is but has a feeling it could be an imager.
  • Mihro thinks there must be other passages that are man-made and that the Peshinooti have not found.
  • Mihro finally finds the hidden passage to the map-chamber but doesn’t understand what it means.
  • He eventually realizes it is a map and begins to redraw it, using different scales.
  • Seeyahnzhi falls sick. Difficult times for the Peshinooti; nobody knows who should be the new chief.
  • Mihro finds the right scale by comparing the frescoes in this chamber and those in the “tunnel of the kings”. He draws the final map but thinks the Peshinooti are not ready to start crazy expeditions all over the ocean.
  • Seeyahnzhi dies. Mihro leaves the map with a note in the cave and returns to D’ni.
  • Mihro goes to ____.
  • Diomu, the new chief, dies in mysterious consequences and is replaced by his sister Shkehlma, the very first female chief. Her cousin Rovehrris bribes a large amount of people in order to overthrow her. She disappears after a second attempt to regain power. Oil-gatherers find her corpse in the marshes four months later. Nobody ever found out what really happened, but Rovehrris was replaced by Perahdet VI soon after that.
  • Birth of Kutchedra.
  • Kutchedra and his father are taken as hostages by Syroban pirates. The captain kills all those who disobey him in front of Kutchedra’s eyes.
  • Mihro’s second mission in ___. This time, it is to study Possopeah, the large continent on the other side of the ___ ocean.
  • Kutchedra “officially” becomes a pirate in order not to be their slave anymore.
  • The pirates’ ship on which Kutchedra was is seized by the emperor’s knavahas (coast guards and solders). Those who do not become “Hayeeks” (former pirates working for the emperor) straight away are hung. Kutchedra accepts the deal and is given three days off so he may check what happened to his relatives while he was the pirates’ captives. He finds out that they have all gone and led a new life far away and that one of his father’s uncles sold all of his belongings to pay part of his debts. Kutchedra kills him in a fit of rage but must then flee in order not to be hung as a murderer. He embarks on the Shurdhi, the ship on which Mihro happens to be.
  • Mihro leaves Obinia and meets Kutchedra as the ship crashes on reefs. They make it out alive and look for other survivors though there are none. Mihro tells Kutchedra about D’ni and brings him there.
  • Mihro and Kutchedra remain in D’ni.
  • Shehsnuri VII becomes Mi’Zhika’s youngest chief.
  • Mihro brings Kutchedra to different Ages.
  • They both leave return to D’ni.
  • Death of Mihro.
  • Kutchedra finds Mi’Zhika and studies Mihro’s journals and notebooks.
  • He starts to make notes of his own in order to try and keep track of what he finds but it is not much.
  • He mentions Mi’Zhika and its inhabitants in his journal, especially the chief, who is slightly older than him. He plans on returning to D’ni soon (he is 50 and wants to celebrate his birthday over there).
  • Kutchedra, who is now about 67 years old, decides to put away Mihro’s work for now since he still doesn’t get what he wanted to do though he figured it had something to do with the Ghortahnti.
  • Death of Kutchedra and his wife.
  • The DRC finds Mihro’s house and Mi’Zhika’s linking book.
  • First expeditions to Mi’Zhika. The DRC as well as a group of linguists and maintainers explain what happened since Kutchedra’s death.
  • Jonas Becchia is given the task to explore the Age first with a couple of maintainers.
  • Jonas Becchia returns to Mi’Zhika with two interns: Natalie Marshall, from the Guild of Linguists, and Stanley Mikalauskas, a newbie from Ottawa who has just finished exploring the Cavern. He eventually leaves them there to study the Age and asks them to send him reports on a regular basis.
  • Natalie intends to open the Age to the public as soon as possible but Jonas is still doubtful.
  • Jonas and the current chief, Diovehrris Shehnooree IV, sign the Age-opening approval. Stanley and Nat leave the necessary notebooks behind and leave the Age.
  • The Age is officially opened to explorers.